The Sleeping Dragon

Our walk yesterday took us over five small hills in the area of the upper Dove valley, one of which was Chrome Hill.  From my photo, it’s easy to see why is it known locally as ‘The Sleeping Dragon’. The classic walk over Chrome Hill is to ‘walk the dragon’s back’ which is exactly what we did.  Stunning views can be enjoyed from the ridge back up the valley towards the moorlands of the Dark Peak to the north, and looking south down the Dove Valley over White Peak countryside towards Parkhouse Hill, Hitter Hill, and High Wheeldon. You can … Continue reading The Sleeping Dragon

Solomon’s Temple, Buxton

Anyone who has been to the Buxton area has probably seen Solomon’s Temple high up on the hillside to the south of the town.  It is a lovely short walk either from Buxton town centre, or from the Pooles Cavern car park, or even nearer from the Buxton Country Park car park near to Grinlow caravan site.  You can climb the spiral staircase to the top of the tower and be rewarded with fabulous views across the landscapes of both the Dark Peak and the White Peak. The tower was built in 1896 by public subscription and is thought to take its … Continue reading Solomon’s Temple, Buxton

Meadow Saxifrage in The White Peak

The White Peak area of the Peak District is fully of beautiful wild flowers at present.  Meadow Saxifrage is just one of many different types of plants that love the limestone soils of this area. It’s Latin name is Saxifraga granulata and that is linked to its use in years gone by as a medicinal plant.  Granulata means ‘with grain’, while Saxifraga means ‘rock-breaker’.   Going back in history, it was believed that it had the power to break up gall stones and kidney stones.   Continue reading Meadow Saxifrage in The White Peak

A Victorian Post Box

There are several Victorian post boxes remaining around the Peak District.  We found this one in the tiny hamlet of Hollinsclough set into the side of a barn.  We don’t know exactly how old it is, but roadside wall boxes first appeared in England in 1857 as a cheaper alternative to pillar boxes, especially in rural districts. Hollinsclough is a conservation village in the upper Dove valley, about eight miles south of Buxton.  The entire hamlet comprises just eleven houses, a Methodist chapel, the village hall, and the school. We pass through Hollins Clough occasionally on our open group guided walks in the Peak District. Continue reading A Victorian Post Box