Rime ice on the rushes

On a very cold walk along Stanage Edge today, I marvelled at the rime ice that had formed on the rushes and other vegetation.

Rime ice is the white curst that builds up on the windward side of objects in exposed areas, thereby showing the direction that the wind has been blowing in.

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The Boxing Gloves

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All around the top edge of Kinder Scout there are fascinating gritstone rock formations.

On our walk today along the northern edge of the mountain, we passed these.  They are known as ‘The Boxing Gloves’.  If you use your imagination a little, you can see a face with gloved, raised hands up in front of it.

Whether you think they look like a man with boxing gloves on or not, it’s a really beautiful place!

Harry Hut on Chunal Moor

Chunal Moor is a beautiful area of high, heather covered moorland in the Dark Peak with paths leading onto it from two points on the A624 between Hayfield and Glossop, and from Mill Hill. Upon studying the Ordnance Survey map, you will see the highest point on the moor is named Harry Hut.

So who was Harry and where is his hut? Well, it appears that no-one knows! There is certainly no hut there now, but there are a few loose rocks around the trig point, so maybe Harry did build some kind of shelter there many years ago. What do you think?

It’s certainly a beautiful place and the paths tend to be quieter than those on nearby Kinder Scout and the Pennine Way.

Harry Hut Trig Point, Chunal Moor

Harry Hut Trig Point, Chunal Moor

 

The Sleeping Dragon

Our walk yesterday took us over five small hills in the area of the upper Dove valley, one of which was Chrome Hill.  From my photo, it’s easy to see why is it known locally as ‘The Sleeping Dragon’.

Chrome Hill

Chrome Hill

The classic walk over Chrome Hill is to ‘walk the dragon’s back’ which is exactly what we did.  Stunning views can be enjoyed from the ridge back up the valley towards the moorlands of the Dark Peak to the north, and looking south down the Dove Valley over White Peak countryside towards Parkhouse Hill, Hitter Hill, and High Wheeldon.

View towards Parkhouse Hill from Chrome Hill

View towards Parkhouse Hill from Chrome Hill

You can enjoy a guided walk with us over Chrome and Parkhouse hills on our occasional open group guided walks, or by hiring your own personal walking guide.

White and purple Ling Heather

Ling Heather in its rare white form

Late August or early September is usually the best time to see heather in flower on the moorlands of the Peak District, and this year is no exception. Out of the three types of wild heather in the area, Ling Heather is by far the most common, giving the moorlands the appearance of being carpeted in purple when in full bloom.

This year on our guided walks, we have been lucky enough on three separate occasions to see Ling Heather in its rare white form as shown in this photograph.

For more information about our guided walks, see www.peakwalking.com

White and purple Ling Heather

White and purple LIng Heather

Nelson's Monument, Birchen Edge

Nelson’s Monument and The Three Ships

Everyone has heard of Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square, London and many people also know of The Nelson Monument on Calton Hill, Edinburgh.  But did you know that in the Peak District we have our own Nelson’s Monument? Not only that, nearby we also have the three historical British fighting ships of Victory, Defiance and Royal Soverin!

Take a walk onto Birchen Edge, one of the gritstone edges that the Dark Peak area is famous for.  The views are stunning and you can also up there find Nelson’s Monument and The Three Ships.  The monument was erected by a local business man called John Brightman in 1810 in honour of Admiral Lord Nelson following his victory and his death at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.  This was some thirty years before the London Nelson’s Column was constructed.  The ‘ships’ are three large gritstone boulders which have had the words Victory, Defiance and Royal Soverin engraved on them like the names on the prow of the ships.

Well worth a visit!

Rock art near Gardoms Edge

Bronze Age Rock Art

The area between Gardoms Edge and Birchen Edge in the Peak District was once the site of a small Bronze age settlement and was farmed by the people who lived there.  If you take a wander around the area, you can find several interesting Bronze Age and Neolithic features hidden among the trees, bracken, heather and grassy areas.  One of the most interesting is this slab of gritstone featuring a ‘ring and cup’ carving.  It is believed to be a Bronze age form of art.  It would be fabulous to be able to look back in time to see the people who made this carving and maybe to understand a little of its significance.

Having found the rock and marveled at it, you should then bend down and tap or knock on it.  You will soon realise that it is not quite what it seems! It sounds hollow inside.  That is because in 1996 the original rock was buried in a secret location nearby to protect it from erosion and other damage and it was replaced by this polyester resin and fiberglass replica.  Just to look at it you would never know.